10+ weeks post-op

I went to dinner with a group of new friends over the weekend. We’re all moms whose children all went to the same school at one point or another. Not necessarily at the same time, but that’s our common denominator. It’s pretty cool, if you ask me. I’m not a people-y person whatsoever so going to dinner with a group of women (one of which I’ve known for about three years now and consider a dear friend) I’ve only known for about a year is very much out of my comfort zone, but it’s been quite enjoyable.

This was actually our second dinner out since my surgery, but the first time it (WLS) came up as a focal point during dinner.

Generally, being the non-people-y person that I am, I absolutely avoid having the conversation be all about me for too long. I’m just not comfortable with it. But Saturday was different. And in a good way.

There was five of us that evening and all but me and one other were of average size. And the one besides me who was a little fluffy, wasn’t morbidly obese like me.

They asked how I was feeling, how I was doing. They commented that I looked good and that they could see a difference in my face and appearance despite my comments of the scale not going down in about a month’s time.

“So what was it that really pushed you to get the surgery?” one spokesperson finally asked.

I smiled. I didn’t feel judged. I felt like they really wanted to know why I went the route I did, when I did. And it all boiled down to just needing a little extra help and not being ashamed to seek it out.

I told them how I’d lost 50-plus pounds three times in my adult life. I told them how I’d been overweight since puberty hit, how I got my first period at age 9 and how, by age 10, I was in a regular adult sized bra (never even knew about “training bras”). I told them how I went to a ton of schools (including 4 high schools) because my mom was constantly evading credit collectors. I told them how food became my best friend- sometimes my only friend.

I also told them about losing 75 pounds in less than a year with a low carb diet (and how freaking HOT I had become) and exercise. I told them about being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2014, and how I’d lost 60 pounds in less than a year by watching what I ate and exercising sometimes twice a day to avoid being put on medication for the diabetes.

I told them all of this not for them to feel sorry for me and not as an excuse for my morbid obesity, but because this was where I came from and this all led to my decision to get WLS. I just had enough with fighting obesity and just needed help getting healthy.

It’s not about being thin for me.

It’s not about Not being fat.

It’s about feeling good and alive and able and HEALTHY.

For once in my friggin life I want to be as healthy as possible… for myself and my sweet baby girl (who is 7).

And for once in my life, I feel like this is all truly doable…thanks to WLS.

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2 thoughts on “10+ weeks post-op

  1. I’m curious as to how the group responded to your confessions… it’s hard sharing fine print details of the past such as those with others. I’m curious how the responded. Did it make sense to them? Were they silent? Did they share anything more about themselves as individuals? In my experiences when I’ve offered pieces of my story I find others tend to share intimate pieces of theirs as well, and it becomes a rather empowering and motivating exchange. Hard to do, need I add, but often rewarding.

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    • it was actually a great experience- sharing it all with them. normally i keep things to myself or write about it so this was a big deal to open up to several people at the same time. but they were all so attentive and kind and they, too, shared some things. empowering is a great way to describe the conversation.

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